This Month In Life
  • Working from Home?
    More and more people have found themselves working remotely the past few months. Are you one of them? Here are seven things to consider to make your home office a place where you can be productive, focused, and comfortable. Read >>
  • Dane, Doberman, or Dachshund?
    With 339 different dog breeds, it can be overwhelming deciding which type of dog to get. If you’re looking for one that fits your family’s lifestyle and pocketbook, consider these questions to narrow down your options. Read >>
  • Safe and Social
    As communities are opening back up, you may be ready to hang out with friends and family again, but getting out and about is trickier than ever. If you’re looking for social activities to do while staying safe from being infected, here are a few ideas. Read >>
  • Quarantine and Isolation
    Your spouse has COVID-19, a coworker came down with the virus, or you have it yourself. So what do you do? Read >>
Health and Fitness News

Dane, Doberman, or Dachshund?

How to choose the best dog breed for your family.

They get you with those puppy eyes. You know they’ll be a lot of work, but you can’t help yourself. Next thing you know, you’re bringing a new dog home.

Getting a new puppy is an exciting event. What will you name it? What will its personality be like? How will it adjust to its new life? A dog can quickly become part of the family, providing years of entertainment and companionship. But how do you choose which one to get?

With 339 different dog breeds, it can be overwhelming deciding which type of dog to get. If you’re looking for one that fits your family’s lifestyle and pocketbook, consider these questions to narrow down your options.

Experience

Have you ever owned a dog before? Do you have experience training a puppy and caring for a pet? These are important questions, because certain dog breeds are easier to train than others. Some dogs are smart, others aren’t, and some are so smart they don’t want to be trained. Obedience training and potty training may take days for some, weeks or months for others. What are you game for?

Exercise

How active are you, and how much exercise are you able to give your dog? In general, the larger the breed, the more exercise they need. Maybe you have a large, fenced-in yard for your dog to run around all day or plan to take your dog on daily jogs. Or perhaps you live in a small apartment and don’t have time to take long walks with your dog. Take these factors into consideration to ensure you pick a dog who will physically thrive in your family.

Shedding

If you plan to keep your dog indoors all or part of the time, it’s important to consider shedding. Dogs have either a fur coat or hair coat. Hair grows longer and sheds less, but may require more frequent grooming. Hair will feel softer and smoother, and is more often considered hypoallergenic. A fur coat, on the other hand, grows shorter, feels coarser, and sheds more.

Household

Who else lives in your home? Certain dog breeds do better with young kids, adults, or the elderly. If you have children or grandchildren, you want a dog that’s gentle, patient, and friendly. Have other pets in the home? You’ll want to go with a dog breed that’s friendly with other animals.

Attention

How often are you home? Are you gone all day, part of the day, days at a stretch, or home most of the time? The amount of attention you’re able to give a dog may help determine what breed is best for your family. Some dogs are fine on their own for hours at a time, while others need a lot more personal attention to be content.

Climate

What’s the weather like where you live? Is it mostly hot and dry, cold and snowy, temperate, or hot and humid? You want to take the climate into consideration when choosing a dog. Some are bred for hot climates, others for cold. Keeping a dog in the wrong climate is stressful for your dog. Be kind and keep your pooch comfy!

Neighborhood

Do you live on a farm, in a neighborhood with houses nearby, or in an apartment with close neighbors? Some dogs are known for loud, persistent barking or howling, others are known to be quieter. You don’t want to annoy your neighbors, so choose a breed that won’t bark or howl at all hours.